Our Blog

Thoughts, news, insights and sometimes just random musings.

WCAG: 1.1.1 Non-text Content

This is the first in a series of blog posts (61 in total!) that will cover the different elements of WCAG compliance. There are tons of official recommendations per the compliance guide here, but for the sake of brevity and efficiency, we'll be focusing on the most common scenarios and easiest ways to make your sites more accessible with the wealth...
Continue reading
  1903 Hits
  0 Comments
1903 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.2.2 Captions (Prerecorded)

Enter heading here... The Fancy Name: 1.2.2 Captions (Prerecorded) - Level A: Captions are provided for all pre-recorded audio content in synchronized media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such. This one is pretty easy to understand, so we'll spend more time understanding actionable things you can do...
Continue reading
  1902 Hits
  0 Comments
1902 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.2.3 Audio Description or Media Alternative (Prerecorded)

What does adding audio descriptions to video mean? So there are captions, which I describe in a previous blog article . However ,   an audio description is more of a narrative of what's happening in the video itself. It needs to contain descriptions such as audible pauses, and laughter, as well as elements that make the video informative and/ ...
Continue reading
  1910 Hits
  0 Comments
1910 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.2.5 Audio Description (Prerecorded)

What does adding an audio description mean? Adding audio descriptions is pretty much what it sounds like. It's simply using spoken audio to describe what's happening in your video content. For example, things to be included in the descriptions would be: Describing/ introducing who's speaking Explaining overall setting, and visual elements that are ...
Continue reading
  1731 Hits
  0 Comments
1731 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 1.3.2: Meaningful Sequence (Screen Readers Are a Thing, People!)

The year is 2005. You're in a bookstore filled with hysterical parents desperately fighting for a dwindling number of newly-released Harry Potter books. It's imperative that you get the book; your daughter has been excited about it for months, and it's not fun if she reads the story after everyone else. Utilizing the kind of high-level athleticism ...
Continue reading
  1824 Hits
  0 Comments
1824 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.3.3 Sensory Characteristics

Imagine that you created a multi-page survey. You placed a blue arrow button at the bottom corner of the page and wrote instructions at the beginning which told users to select it in order to navigate to the following page. Someone experiencing visual impairment may not be able to find that arrow button referenced in the instructions based on the i...
Continue reading
  1783 Hits
  0 Comments
1783 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.4.1 Use of Color (Nothing Wrong With Standing Out)

So far in our noble quest to make WCAG 2.0 understandable, we've discussed a number of ways to provide alternatives to content on your site that would otherwise be difficult for those experiencing visual or auditory impairment to understand, such as alt text, captioning, sign language, and audio descriptions. The set of guidelines in WCAG 1.4 'Dist...
Continue reading
  1535 Hits
  0 Comments
1535 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG: 1.4.2 Audio Control (It's Not 1995; Please Keep Your Website Quiet)

Anyone using a screen reader will experience the content on your website as audio. So, if your site contains a sound component that plays automatically, someone with visual impairment who relies on screen reader technology may have a difficult time, as the audio from their screen reader will have to compete with the sound on your site. Separate Con...
Continue reading
  1390 Hits
  0 Comments
1390 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.1.1: Keyboard

If you've been following the posts in this astonishingly well-written accessibility project of ours, then good news! We are now finished with the first principle of WCAG. We know how excited you must be to explore the bountiful world of swashbuckling adventure that awaits you in WCAG 2, so we'll dive right into it. Whereas Principle 1 of WCAG deals...
Continue reading
  1584 Hits
  0 Comments
1584 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.1.2: No Keyboard Trap (We Need an Exit Strategy)

Give your readers a way out! Unless you're designing a nefarious maze to trap unsuspecting super-spies on your Island of Doom, you don't want to leave people without a way out. If someone is relying on a keyboard or keyboard emulator navigate your website (as described in WCAG 2.1.1 ), make sure you avoid creating "keyboard traps" It's a Trap! ​ &l...
Continue reading
  1379 Hits
  0 Comments
1379 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.1.4: Character Key Shortcuts

Character key shortcuts on sites and apps can be an elegant tool that allows many keyboard users to navigate the web quickly and efficiently (if you're curious, here's a demonstration): via GIPHY At the same time, these shortcuts can frustrate and slow down users who rely on speech input programs to operate the web, as well as those who have dexter...
Continue reading
  1639 Hits
  0 Comments
1639 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.2.2: Pause, Stop, Hide (Give Me a Break)

This post is all about distractions. Now, I know what you're thinking. "Distractions? Isn't that what the Internet is for?" That may be true, but nevertheless there may be distracting features on your site that would pose issues for people experiencing visual limitations or attention deficit disorders. With that in mind, we're going to take some ti...
Continue reading
  4528 Hits
  0 Comments
4528 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.4.1: Bypass Blocks

Recently we've been discussing the various elements of Principle 2, which covers ways you can make your site more easily operable for users experiencing certain visual, cognitive, or physical limitations, as well as those prone to seizures. We are now moving onto the last set of rules in Principle 2, Guideline 2.4, in which we'll go over navigabili...
Continue reading
  1825 Hits
  0 Comments
1825 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.4.2: Page Titles

WCAG 2.4.2 is simple enough (page titles are your friend) but we know how much you enjoy reading detailed WCAG guidelines, so here we go! As we discussed in our previous post, sighted users tend to have an advantage in navigating websites because they can see all the elements of a page laid out together. It's easy to take for granted, but anyone wh...
Continue reading
  1309 Hits
  0 Comments
1309 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.4.3: Focus Order

Let's say that, in an effort to use crowdsourcing techniques to decide on which kind of pizza you should eat for dinner, you create a survey on your site for people to fill in. The survey begins with fields where users are asked to enter their name and contact information, followed by a series of questions where they indicate their answers by selec...
Continue reading
  1489 Hits
  0 Comments
1489 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.4.4: Link Purpose (In Context)

In our article on WCAG 2.4.2 , we discussed the importance of descriptive page titles. If you're anything like us, you spend your days deep in thought, pondering new ways to make your website more accessible and enjoyable for all. Thankfully, we did most of the hard work for you! In this post, we'll talk about why it's a good idea to provide adequa...
Continue reading
  1623 Hits
  0 Comments
1623 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.5.1: Pointer Gestures

Let's imagine for a moment that you need to look up driving directions to Disneyland. (By the way, did you know Google lists Disneyland as "Good for kids"? Go figure!) On your phone, as you'd expect, you can manipulate the map using the touchscreen, dragging your finger to shift the map in a given direction and pinching with two fingers to zoom in....
Continue reading
  1490 Hits
  0 Comments
1490 Hits
0 Comments

WCAG 2.5.2: Pointer Cancellation

Users with various disabilities and limitations may be more prone to accidentally initiating a function they didn't intend to when using their pointers. With that in mind, the fine folks at WCAG have suggested that, for functionality that's operated using a single pointer—such as single or double taps and clicks, long presses, or path-based gesture...
Continue reading
  1331 Hits
  0 Comments
1331 Hits
0 Comments