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If you've been following our blog series on accessibility, you've likely seen mention of WCAG's different levels of conformance. In short, they are Levels A, AA, and AAA, each of which successively describing a higher standard of accessibility. Each WCAG criterion we're discussing in this blog series has a conformance level designation. Often, thes...
Let's say for a moment that you are registering for something online, but when you get to the page asking for your personal information, you try to move ahead without entering anything (maybe you're lazy, or perhaps you have a Ron-Swanson-like passion for privacy). Rather than advancing to the next screen, messages in red appear under the fields yo...
A quick note right off the bat: you probably don't need to worry about this rule unless you're developing or scripting your own user interface components for your site, or you're just very interested in WCAG guidelines. For any user interface component—including links, form elements, and components generated by scripts—it is crucial that the follow...
The last few exciting chapters in our dynamic WCAG adventure have concerned the various guidelines of Principle 3, which stresses the importance of making information and the operation of user interface understandable. Now, we will move onto Principle 4, in which we'll go over how to ensure that the content of your site is robust enough to work rel...
In our post on WCAG 3.3.4 Error Prevention (Legal, Financial, Data) , we discussed why it's important to give users a chance to confirm and correct sensitive data or information they may have entered into an online form, specifically relating to financial and legal matters. It's easy for anyone to make mistakes inputting data online, but it's espec...
You've likely noticed little "help" buttons at times appearing next to certain input fields, like those featured in the image here: [Source: https://uxplanet.org/streamlining-the-checkout-experience-b4b00840884a ] For the past several posts, we've focused on ways you can provide guidance to users who are inputting data and information on your site,...
Whenever we buy things online it's typical to see an order confirmation page before completing checkout. It provides, among other things, a valuable opportunity to reflect on your terrible financial decision-making. But this function isn't just so you can enjoy another look at the highly irresponsible purchase you've just made. Everyone makes simpl...
In our post on WCAG 3.3.1 Error Identification , we discussed why it's important to identify and describe user input errors when they are automatically detected. Though that practice is helpful for many users, some may still find it difficult to ascertain the precise nature of an error and correct it; for instance, those experiencing cognitive limi...
If your site requires users to input data or information—such as in a survey, ecommerce checkout window, or email newsletter sign-up—you should provide labels and instructions so they know what is expected of them. ​ [Source: http://designwoop.com/2014/07/29-checkout-interfaces-ecommerce-web-design/ ] ​ This isn't just helpful for those who rely on...
In Guideline 3.2, we discussed why it's important that pages appear and operate in a manner that is predictable and intuitive. Now we'll talk about the criteria of Guideline 3.3, which outlines ways you can help users avoid and correct mistakes. Identifying Errors ​ Let's say you're upset because you made a really good sandwich for lunch but then d...
In our posts on WCAG 3.2.1 On Focus  and WCAG 3.2.2 On Input , we discussed why unexpected changes of context can result in confusion for some users. In this post, we'll focus on automatic changes. Changes of context on your site should only be initiated by user request, or else there should be a mechanism available by which users can turn off...
People who use screen readers to operate the Internet depend greatly on their familiarity with functions that appear on different pages within a site. Say, for instance, that you're once again making a poor financial decision online. [Source: etsy.com] On one page, you find a printer icon which, when selected, prints your receipt of purchase. Howev...
Let's say you're so impressed with this article series on WCAG that you're searching your local library for a book to send the author as a homage to their overwhelming talent. [Source: nypl.org] You're looking for a particular title, but you aren't sure of the book's author, so you spend some time trying different keywords in the search bar and pla...
In our previous post concerning WCAG 3.2.1 On Focus , we discussed why you should avoid unexpected changes of context. A change in setting refers to the act of inputting data to a component, such as a checklist or text field. Just as a change in focus to a user interface component shouldn't result in a change of context, a change in setting should ...
In Guideline 3.1, we discussed ways to ensure that the content on your site is readable and understandable. Now, we will talk about the various criteria of Guideline 3.2, which revolves around making your site appear and operate predictably and intuitively. WCAG 3.2.1: The Basics ​ Let's say you're planning a trip to New York City, and, because you...