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Principle 2 of WCAG has been concerned with operability. In this article, we are moving onto Principle 3, which is all about making sure information and interfaces on your site are understandable to all users who may come across your page. The first guideline in this principle, WCAG 3.1, helps ensure that the text content on your site is readable a...
In our previous post , we discussed why it's important to set a default language for your page. Setting a default language ensures browsers and other user agents, including assistive technologies like screen readers, present text and linguistic content correctly. That article described the most basic, or level A, standard for this rule. Here, we'll...
Let's imagine for a moment that you just went to Chicago on vacation (pro tip: forget the pizza; the hot dogs are killer). You want to learn more about the architectural history of the city, so you do some research on the web. However, the articles you find use a lot of architectural and civil engineering terms you've never seen before. You might b...
If your site contains abbreviations, it's recommended that you provide a way for users to access their expanded forms. Similar to our previous post on unusual words , this will help those who have trouble with comprehension or construing meaning from context. It's also a useful practice for people with limited memory, as well as for anyone relying ...
If the text on your site is more advanced than a lower secondary education reading level (that is, 9 years of schooling), you should provide either supplemental content or an alternate version of the text that is not so complex. Even professionals in a given field can have certain reading disorders, like dyslexia, which may make it especially hard ...
Just in case your life wasn't confusing enough already, whoever was in charge of creating the English language invented heteronyms, which are two or more words spelled identically but having different pronunciations and definitions. Heteronyms, if lacking proper context, might make a piece of text, such as a page on a website (*hint* *hint*), uncle...
In Guideline 3.1, we discussed ways to ensure that the content on your site is readable and understandable. Now, we will talk about the various criteria of Guideline 3.2, which revolves around making your site appear and operate predictably and intuitively. WCAG 3.2.1: The Basics ​ Let's say you're planning a trip to New York City, and, because you...
In our previous post concerning WCAG 3.2.1 On Focus , we discussed why you should avoid unexpected changes of context. A change in setting refers to the act of inputting data to a component, such as a checklist or text field. Just as a change in focus to a user interface component shouldn't result in a change of context, a change in setting should ...
Let's say you're so impressed with this article series on WCAG that you're searching your local library for a book to send the author as a homage to their overwhelming talent. [Source: nypl.org] You're looking for a particular title, but you aren't sure of the book's author, so you spend some time trying different keywords in the search bar and pla...
People who use screen readers to operate the Internet depend greatly on their familiarity with functions that appear on different pages within a site. Say, for instance, that you're once again making a poor financial decision online. [Source: etsy.com] On one page, you find a printer icon which, when selected, prints your receipt of purchase. Howev...
In our posts on WCAG 3.2.1 On Focus  and WCAG 3.2.2 On Input , we discussed why unexpected changes of context can result in confusion for some users. In this post, we'll focus on automatic changes. Changes of context on your site should only be initiated by user request, or else there should be a mechanism available by which users can turn off...
In Guideline 3.2, we discussed why it's important that pages appear and operate in a manner that is predictable and intuitive. Now we'll talk about the criteria of Guideline 3.3, which outlines ways you can help users avoid and correct mistakes. Identifying Errors ​ Let's say you're upset because you made a really good sandwich for lunch but then d...
If your site requires users to input data or information—such as in a survey, ecommerce checkout window, or email newsletter sign-up—you should provide labels and instructions so they know what is expected of them. ​ [Source: http://designwoop.com/2014/07/29-checkout-interfaces-ecommerce-web-design/ ] ​ This isn't just helpful for those who rely on...
In our post on WCAG 3.3.1 Error Identification , we discussed why it's important to identify and describe user input errors when they are automatically detected. Though that practice is helpful for many users, some may still find it difficult to ascertain the precise nature of an error and correct it; for instance, those experiencing cognitive limi...
Whenever we buy things online it's typical to see an order confirmation page before completing checkout. It provides, among other things, a valuable opportunity to reflect on your terrible financial decision-making. But this function isn't just so you can enjoy another look at the highly irresponsible purchase you've just made. Everyone makes simpl...